If you are late in the college process:

Fustrated

The Big Picture

Getting into college is a project/process. Multiple steps are required and many times the steps should be and are required to be in chronological order. Our goal at Clark College Funding Inc, is to help you find multiple colleges that meet your family's standards academically, socially, and financially. This tool hopes to help accomplish this goal by communicating the college planning process in a "ideal" timeline format.  The big picture is communicated by using the yearly timelines.  These timelines list the major steps over a calendar year in an ideal world, under perfect conditions, and with no other workload to consider.

 

Junior Year

 

September

 

  • Get Organized: One of the most overwhelming aspects of researching and applying to colleges is the amount of information that you will gather. Be prepared by being organized. Use a binder as your college planning itinerary, address book, scrapbook. For each college of interest, you’ll want certain items and information to be handy. Have a place for each college and plan to include room for contact information for admissions and financial aid, applications and correspondence from the college, and any view books/marketing materials of interest that the college may send you.
  • Clean up your Facebook: For some students, this may not be an issue, for others, it will be a necessity. Before you begin the college process, you need to be sure that you are represented in an appropriate way in cyberspace. Make sure your Facebook account is devoid of any unflattering pictures/comments. Make sure your email address is a professional one, or at the very least, tasteful. Much of your correspondence with colleges will be through email and social networking, so it is important to convey an appropriate image through these channels.
  • Review for the PSAT :The PSAT is the “Practice” SAT. It allows junior year high school students to prepare for the SAT and enters them into the National Merit Scholarship Program. The PSAT, also called the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT) gives junior year students the opportunity to qualify for scholarships and recognition. Some high schools administer the PSAT for all juniors. Ask your high school guidance counselor for information regarding the PSAT, and visit www.collegeboard.com for study materials and more information. Like all tests, preparation for the PSAT is vital. We highly recommend ePrep for your test preparation needs. Visit their web site at www.ePrep.com for product details, but do not purchased the product through the web site, as you will pay more than necessary. To purchase an ePrep product, contact Clark College Funding Inc.
  • Commit to being the best student you can be: Education works if you work it! Since you will be applying to colleges in the beginning of your senior year, most colleges will be looking at your junior year grades and your first semester senior year grades. Challenging courses such as Honors or AP courses are exactly what admission officers like to see on college applications. Showing that you're willing to push yourself by taking rigorous classes in high school can help when you're applying to college. Honors and college-level courses can also help you learn the skills and habits you'll need for success in college such as better study habits, time management, discipline, stronger writing skills and problem solving abilities. One of the first things colleges will look at is the level of courses you take. Take the time to sit down with your high school guidance counselor to review your courses.

To help with being the best student you can be, please see the below resources:

Study Guides

○         Khan Academy

○         Hippo Campus

○         Cengage Learning

 

 

Please Read the chapter, download and sign your CAFMCA Commitment[content_box_green width="75%"]CAFMCA Commitment for Parents Certificate[/content_box_green]


 

October

5.13)  Watch Video of Meeting #1 GOALS

 

5.14)  Read Chapter 17, STEP 4: Goal Planning to Pay for Colleges

 

5.15Meeting #1: Goals Meeting with CCF Coach (Manga & Summa Members)

 

5.16)  Complete a Career Profile/Personality Test

Now is the time to complete a personality assessment. This is the first in a series of steps. If you are a Manga Cum Laude or Summa Cum Laude member please log into My Career Profile (MCP) below.

I highly recommend the MCP program for the career assessment. You can visit their website at www.http://www.careerdimensions.com. (But do not purchase the product through the web site, as you will pay more than necessary). You can upgrade your membership and this is included in the upgrade or you can purchase the program at a discounted price by contacting Clark College Funding.

My Career Profile:

An Introduction to MCP Video

MCP Login

Career Guides:

O*NET Online

5.17) Select a major

After completing your Career Profile, you need to start to narrow down your majors. The MCP program will list potential careers based on how you responded to the test questions. Research any career paths in which you are interested and follow your career choice to a college major. Selecting the major will be an ongoing process, keep thinking about it until you are confident of your choice.

 

5.18) Get to know your Clark College Funding Coach

Our team is dedicated to coaching and tracking your family’s college experience .Your coach strives to act as your best ally and guide through the college process. The better you know each other, the more your consultant can help! For your part, you should try to be receptive to your coach's advice and responsive to phone calls and emails. Our team will make every effort to do the same. Over the course of your family’s relationship with Clark College Funding, you’ll see that your coach’s main function is similar to that of a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) device that one might take on a road trip. Just as a GPS gives directions and guides you through a maze of streets and avenues toward a specific destination, Clark College Funding gives directions and guides you through a maze of tangled rules and regulations toward a college education. A GPS has a “voice” to give you verbal directions. The “voice” of your system will reach you via emails and phone calls. These communications will include reminders, tips, directions, and pertinent information necessary for a smooth journey to college. Just as you could lose your way if you ignore your GPS’ “voice”, dismissing your Coach’s “voice” could result in a similar effect. While missing a turn on a road trip may cause you to have to retrace your path, missing a turn on the way to college may result in a rejection letter or loss of aid dollars. Resolve to make communication a priority, and you’ll be arriving at your destination before you know it.

 

5.19) Read Chapter 2, Mistake #1: Depending on the College's Financial Aid Officer (FAO) for Unbiased Financial Advice

 

5.20) Read Chapter 3, Mistake #2: Relying on Your Accountant or CPA for College Financial Aid Advice

 

5.21) Read Chapter 4, Mistake #3: Investing in a 529 Plan If Your Children Are in High School

 

5.22) Hold Monthly Meeting with CCF Coach (Summa Members)

 

 


 

November

 

5.23) Schedule your Student Positioning session with counselor to narrow down schools (Magna and Summa Members)

 

5.24) Follow your timeline

 

5.25) Attend college fairs

 

5.26) Watch Video of Meeting #2 Enrollment Management

 

5.27) Read Chapter 8, Mistake #7: Imagining the Financial Aid Process is Fair

 

5.28)  Read Chapter 13, Knowing the Rules of the Game

 

5.29)  Read Chapter 11, Mistake #10: Failing to Know the Difference Between "EFC" vs. "Your Ability to Pay"

 

5.30)  Hold Meeting #2: THE GAME PLAN(Magan and Summa Members)

 


 

December

 

5.31)       Know what your EFC is and what it means to your family

Now is the time to think about financial aid options and figure out your family’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Financial aid is based on a family’s EFC. Your EFC is determined by the financial information provided on your financial aid forms, the FAFSA, CSS Profile or the school’s own financial aid form. This EFC figure will be the amount the colleges believe you can afford to pay towards your student’s first year at college. The EFC is a figure that is calculated yearly by the financial forms that are completed.

 

  • Another resource to calculate your family’s EFC:   Finaid.org

You may qualify for merit aid, need-based aid, or both. Your EFC, the student’s grades, and standardized test scores are three of many items schools use to determine the type of financial aid options for which you are eligible.  Please speak with your Coach for assistance regarding your initial EFC calculation and financial aid options..

 

5.32)  Read Chapter 28: STEP 15: Cash Flow Is King: Financial Leaks and Opportunity Cost

 

5.33)   Read Chapter 29: STEP 16: Asset Planning

 

5.34)  Have a parent/student family discussion on affordability

Armed with your EFC number, a parent may want to set a price component to the decision making process of selecting colleges. Left open and not discussed, the results can be disastrous, financially. An analogy may help: When a new family first attempts to buy a house, the bank will come up with a figure that the family can afford to pay back in reasonable and affordable monthly payments. Armed with this number, the family can go and shop for a house that will not exceed that amount. They will shop within their budget with a defined limit.

It is the same with a college. For most families, the EFC is a hard number to understand as it may be a lot. Your EFC is what the colleges believe you can afford to pay for your student's first year at college. If for example, the college costs $40,000 per year and your EFC is $30,000, then your financial need at the college is $10,000. Most schools do not meet 100% of a family’s need. If a college can only meet 50% of a family’s need, then they will award you $5,000 in financial aid. This means the college will expect you to contribute your $30,000 EFC, in addition to the gap that they cannot fill, in this case, the other $5,000. Your total first year investment will be $35,000.

Knowing your EFC and how much is a reasonable and affordable monthly payment for college beforehand allows you to “shop” logically for colleges, rather than emotionally. Emotionally driven decisions can be costly. Now is the time to have the affordability discussion within your family before college applications even begin to be filled out.

 

5.35) Know your credit score

When it comes time to apply for student loans, you’ll want to be in good standing. This will give you the best loan options when it becomes necessary to borrow. Knowing what your credit score is now will give you ample time to repair it if necessary.

 

5.36) Read Chapter 9: Mistake #8: Believing That You Should Not Apply to Private Colleges Because of the Sticker Price

 

5.37) Read Chapter 6, Mistake #5: Believing That a Degree from a So-called "Prestigious College" Will Always Enhance Learning or Guarantee You a Better Career

 

5.38) Hold Monthly Meeting/ Asset Positioning Meeting (Magna & Summa Members)

[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

 


 

January

 

5.39)   Read Chapter 18, STEP 5 Clarify What You Want: Family College Standards

5.42) Read Chapter 19, STEP 6: Channeling: Top-down Approach

 

5.43) Read Chapter 20, STEP 7: Collect the College Numbers and Compare to College Selection

5.44) Read Chapter 21, STEP 8: Purge Your List Using Emotional Intelligence and F.E.A.R

5.45) Read Chapter 22, STEP 9: Know the Facts and Gather Information

5.46) Read Chapter 23, STEP 10: Dismissal of Colleges

5.47)   Narrow down your colleges

[content_box_light_green width="75%"]Schedule your Student Positioning session if not complete (Magna and Summa Members) to narrow down your colleges with our college guidance counselors

Student Positioning involves student self-assessment, selection of a major, and a custom college search implemented under the guidance of an experienced Student Positioning counselor. The philosophy behind this method is that student success is dependent upon school fit. By assessing strengths and interests, choosing an appropriate major, and then applying those criteria to a college search, students can be sure that the schools they are considering fit them academically, socially and financially. It is important to take care of this step as early as possible in order to stay on track. To schedule your Student Positioning session, contact your Service Center consultant.

[/content_box_light_green]

To help with you with finding colleges, please see additional resources to find appropriate colleges:

■   College Search Engines

 

■   College Additional Research

  • College Datasheets
  • College Results
  • Student Reviews   “This site offers comments made by students who have attended the college you are looking into. Please take the statements with some discretion. The overall site I believe can be used with the virtual tour sites listed in this section as a first take on a college. Remember some of the comments could have been made by a student on a bad day at the campus. We strongly recommend a physical visit to establish your own personal opinion when time and resources allow.”
  • College With Honors Programs

 

Students Interested in Pre-Med (Medical Sites and Information):

 

Students with Learning Disabilities

  1. Kravitz and Wax's K& W Guide to College For Students with Learning Disabilities 11 Edition, 2011 published by Random House and Princeton Review

Television Film and Digital Media Programs

  1. "Television Film And Digital Media Programs" published by Princeton Review - ISBN 0-375-76520-4.
  2. "Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation"

 

Religious College Information:

 

Virtual and/or Online Tours:
Virtual or online tours can also give you an idea of what the college is like. You may want to use a virtual tour before you visit to get an overall view of the school. To visit a virtual tour site:

Other recommended college books:

  1. College Aid For Middle Class America: Solutions to Paying Wholesale vs. Retail
  2. Rugg’s Recommendations on the Colleges
  3. College Board – Book of Majors
  4. Fiske Guide to Colleges
  5. Princeton Review – Top 377 Colleges
  6. USN&WR – Ultimate College Guide

 

 

 

5.48) Create your list of 6 to 15 colleges you would like to visit

Tools to use when you actually visit a college:

 

 

5.49)      Begin a rough draft of your student resume.

Now is a good time to create your initial student resume. Begin to keep a list of awards, jobs, community service, and other accomplishments as you go through your high school years. Keeping this list updated on a regular basis will make writing your final resume much easier. Resumes are seldom required for the admissions process, but we believe that they are a valuable asset in marketing yourself to colleges.

  •  College Navigator Resume Template

[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

 


 

February

 

5.49)       Listen to the February teleconference (Magna and Summa Members)

This month’s topic, “Discussion on SAT/ACT,” covers the pros and cons as well as necessary knowledge points for both standardized tests. “Discussion on SAT/ACT” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.50)  Read Chapter 7 Mistake #6: Thinking That Not Scoring Well on the SAT or ACT Means a Less Successful Future

 

5.51)  Read Chapter 24:STEP 11: In "Depth" Study: Is the Movie Critic Always Right?

 

5.52)  Prepare for SAT/ACT tests and develop your test schedule

Like all tests, preparation for the SAT/ACT is vital. We highly recommend ePrep for your test preparation needs. Visit their website at www.ePrep.com for product details, but do not purchased the product through the website, as you will pay more than necessary.

**Please upgrade to the Magna Cum Laude to get either the SAT or the ACT Eprep. Please upgrade to the Summa Cum Laude to get both the SAT and the ACT Eprep.

 

■         In order to maximize your SAT/ACT scores, we suggest taking each test once during your junior year. Then, after you have an opportunity to review your scores and decide on which test you perform better, you can focus your study efforts on the appropriate material and retake that test.

■         Reasons to take ACT vs. SAT

■         SAT/ACT from the College Navigator

■         SAT Jewel

■         SAT/ACT Conversion Chart

■         SAT Test Dates

■         ACT Test Dates

■         SAT II College List

■         Vocabulary Builder

 

 

5.53)    Read Chapter 25, STEP 12: The L.U.C.K.Y Visit

 

5.54)   Start visiting colleges

  • Visiting a campus is the best way to get a personal assessment as to how you will “fit” at that school. This is a surefire way to get a feel for the campus spirit, dorms, location, etc. Most colleges track your activities through the admissions process, “scoring” your interest level, and may be more apt to offer admissions and/or funding to students with demonstrable interest.
  • Virtual or online tours can also give you an idea of what the college is like. You may want to use a virtual tour before you visit to get an overall view of the school. To visit a virtual tour site:

Tools to use when you actually visit a college:


March

5.55)        Listen to the March teleconference (Magna and Summa Members)

This month’s topic, “Visitations, Why, How, What to Do,” features a discussion on the importance of visiting colleges, and how to get the most out of your visit. “Visitations, Why, How, What to Do” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.56)         Begin planning summer activities

Put your time to good use. Think about volunteering, studying or taking a trip abroad, taking an online course, or enrolling in a summer program at your local community college. Choosing an activity outside of your comfort zone lets colleges know that you are willing to work hard for your goals.

 

5.57)     Develop a plan for your senior year.

If you have not done so already, meet with your high school guidance counselor before your junior year is over, and set up your senior year courses. Make sure that the courses you take in your senior year cover the basic requirements for college entrance. Athletes should be sure that they are on track to fulfill NCAA requirements (visit www.ncaaeligibilitycenter.org). Why not challenge yourself and take AP or honors level courses? Admissions offices will take notice.

Athletic Guides:

Recruiting Sites

[divider_bar_wide]divider [/divider_bar_wide]

 


 

April

 

5.58)           Listen to the April teleconference (Magna and Summa Members)

“Proactive Student’s Agenda,” will discuss the steps that students can take to stay ahead of the crowd. “Proactive Student’s Agenda” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

5.59)         Continue college visitations

 

5.60)      Contact the colleges that interest you most. Remember, visiting a campus is the best way to get a personal assessment of “fit.” Remember also that the colleges are keeping track of students who show an interest in their school. When you visit a college, speak with an admissions counselor. The counselor will note in your admissions file that you took the time to speak with him/her regarding your interest in that college. The same information will be entered into your file every time you make an appointment or phone call and speak to a professor, staff member, or department head.


 

May

 

5.61)      Listen to the May teleconference (Magna and Summa Members)

“Discussion on Scholarships,” will cover private scholarship searches. “Discussion on Scholarships” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.62)       Begin your search for private scholarships

First, look at local companies, businesses, civic groups and government offices and visit your local library and chamber of commerce. Next, research free online scholarship search sites.

**Reminder: Clark College Funding does not do private scholarship searches due to the personal nature of the search and also due to the fact the big money for colleges is NOT the private scholarship search, but in the selection of the right college who will admit and invest in the student as opposed to just admit the student.**

■         Scholarship Booklet

 

Local Scholarship Resources

 

■         Scholarship Search Resources

Research your state’s education programs:

Many (though not all) states have their own educational programs that offer scholarships, grants or loan opportunities. For information on your state’s specific programs:

 

State Scholarship Programs:

■         Alabama

■         Connecticut

■         Delaware

■         District of Columbia

■         Florida

■         Georgia

■         Indiana

■         Kentucky

■         Louisiana

■         Maine

■         Maryland

■         Massachusetts

■         Michigan

■         Mississippi

■         New Hampshire

■         New Jersey

■         New York

■         North Carolina

■         Ohio

■         Oregon

■         Pennsylvania

■         Rhode Island

■         South Carolina

■         Tennessee

■         Vermont

■         Virginia

■         West Virginia

 

○         State Scholarship Applications

■         Alaska

■         Colorado

■         Hawaii

■         Idaho

■         Illinois

■         Kansas

■         Michigan

■         Minnesota

■         Montana

■         Nevada

■         New Mexico

■         North Dakota

■         Oklahoma

■         Oregon

■         South Dakota

■         Texas

■         Utah

■         Washington

■         Wyoming

 

○         State Grant Programs

■         Alabama

■         California

■         Connecticut

■         Delaware

■         District of Columbia

■         Florida

■         Georgia

■         Indiana

■         Kentucky

■         Louisiana

■         Maine

■         Maryland

■         Massachusetts

■         Michigan

■         Mississippi

■         New Hampshire

■         New Jersey

■         New York

■         North Carolina

■         Ohio

■         Pennsylvania

■         Rhode Island

■         South Carolina

■         Tennessee

■         Vermont

■         Virginia

■         West Virginia

○         State Grant Applications

■         Alaska

■         Arizona

■         California

■         Hawaii

■         Illinois

■         Kansas

■         Michigan

■         Minnesota

■         Montana

■         New Mexico

■         North Dakota

■         Oklahoma

■         Oregon

■         Texas

■         Utah

■         Washington

■         Wyoming

 

○         Agreement State Discounts

 

5.62)       Read Chapter 12: Mistake #11: Spending Too Much Time and Money to Find Private Scholarships

 

5.63)        Continue to narrow down your college list and continue college visitations

Don’t forget to apply the student positioning concept. We highly recommend that you apply to at least three colleges from the “green list” in the Student Positioning Program, and would further suggest an ideal target of six “green” colleges. As a reminder, colleges that are “in the green” are schools to which you should be readily admitted, excel academically, and which are most likely to offer the best merit and need-based aid. It is our philosophy that at least “three in the green” makes for promising overall results - both academically and financially.

 

5.64)        Be sure to speak with admissions counselors and make contact with department heads during your visit. Colleges look favorably toward students who show an interest in getting to know their school.

 

5.65)       Practice for college admissions interviews

Some colleges require that you go through an admissions interview as part of the admissions process. Others either “highly recommend” it, or make no mention of an admissions interview at all. In any/all of these cases, make sure that you are prepared. Whether an interview is required/recommended or not, it can always serve a valuable purpose as a way to improve your standing with the school, as an opportunity to market yourself, or as a part of your own college vetting process. View our list of common college interview questions and the College Interview Booklet:

 

5.66)          Continue to work on your resume

While resumes are not typically required as part of the admissions application, we believe they are a critical component in telling the colleges who you are and what you have accomplished.

 

5.67)       Start drafting your admissions essays

Many colleges publish admission applications and essay topics during the summer. Begin thinking about your topic and remember that the chief function of an admissions essay is to give the colleges an idea of who you are and how you think. Clark College Funding offers a fee-based essay service that assists with writing, editing, and reviewing your work. This is included in the Summa Cum Laude Plan.

  • College Essay Service

○         Existing Client Login

○         New Client Registration/Information

5.68)       Begin identifying individuals to write your letters of recommendation

Colleges usually require two or three letters of recommendation from people who have known you during your high school years. Identify those teachers, counselors, employers, or other non-family members who will be your best advocates and ask them if they would be willing to write a letter of recommendation for you in the fall.

 


June

5.69)         Listen to the June teleconference (Magna and Summa Program)

“What is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC)?” explains the EFC and how it is used by colleges in determining financial aid eligibility. “What is the Expected Family Contribution (EFC)?” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.70)      Read Chapter 5, Mistake #4: Not Applying for "Early Action"

 

5.71)       Continue to narrow down your college list

Now is the time to trim your list to the six to ten colleges that you will definitely want to apply to for admission in the fall. We highly recommend that you apply to at least three colleges from the “green list” in the Student Positioning Program, and would further suggest an ideal target of six “green” colleges. As a reminder, colleges that are “in the green” are schools to which you should be readily admitted, excel academically, and which are most likely to offer the best merit- and need-based aid.

 

5.72)     Continue college visitations

Make sure to physically visit those colleges to which you will apply to. Remember, a college visit is the best way to get a feel for what college life would be like at that school as it gives you the opportunity to see the campus in action.

 


 

July

5.73)          Listen to the July teleconference

“College Applications, Essays, and Resumes,” will cover the admissions application process. “College Applications, Essays, and Resumes” is slated to last about an hour. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.74)        Review admissions application requirements

Most high school seniors apply to college in November, but keep in mind that if you are applying Early Decision or Early Action, deadlines may occur as early as October 1st. Many colleges post their admission applications during the summer. Visit the websites of each college on your list to review what is required as part of their admission process.

■         Reminder: Clark College Funding does not complete admissions applications for students.

 

5.75)       Read Chapter 12, Mistake #11: Spending Too Much Time and Money to Find Private Scholarships

 

5.76)        Continue to search for private scholarships

Private scholarships may be found in your local community or through online search sites. To get a list of links to scholarship search engines and local scholarships:

Scholarship Booklet

 

  • Local Scholarship Resources

○         Community on Foundations

○         Scholarship America

○         Guaranteed-Scholarship Programs

  • Scholarship Search Resources

○         Merit Aid

○         Fast Web

○         Sallie Mae

○         College NET

Reminder: Clark College Funding does not perform private scholarship searches due to the personal nature of the search and also due to the fact the big money for colleges is NOT the private scholarship search but in the selection of the right college who will admit and invest in the student as opposed to just admit the student.

5.77)      Register for your senior year SAT/ACT test and SAT II

Registration deadlines occur roughly one month prior to the test date, so plan accordingly.

In addition to the standard entrance exams (SAT/ACT), some colleges require completion of SAT subject tests, called SAT II. If you are applying to one of these schools, or if you want to show off your proficiency in a specific subject, you will need to register. Information can also be found at www.collegeboard.org (for SAT and SAT II) or www.act.org (for ACT).

 

 


 

 

August

 

5.78)          Listen to the August teleconference (Magna and Summa Members)

“College Picks and a Discussion of EA/ED,” will cover the two types of early admission policies offered by colleges. The first half of the teleconference will be conducted in lecture form, while the second half will be devoted to questions and answers. As is the case with all of our teleconferences, it will be recorded and made available on our website as a download. If you are unable to join the live teleconference, or if you just want to review the material, you can access all of our podcasts as they become available.

1. Log in to your ENGUS account 2. Go to Family Resources > Communication Support > Monthly College Teleconference Schedule 3. Choose the teleconference schedule for your graduation year 4. Right-click and choose "Save target as…" to download a podcast to your computer.

 

5.79)        Consider your application status

At this point you should be pretty close to having your final college list. Now is the time to decide which college application status you will use to apply to these colleges. There are three common types of college applications, Regular Decision, Early Decision and Early Action.

  • Regular decision is the normal process by which students apply for admission typically between January 1 and February 15. There are no restrictions on the number of schools you can apply to under Regular Admissions. Applicants are usually notified of their acceptance status and financial aid in April of their senior year. Some colleges will give admissions decisions well before April 1, but the student is under no obligation to make a decision about whether to attend until May 1.
  • The second type of application is Early Decision. Early Decision (ED) programs are usually binding, meaning that the applicant promises from the start that if their application is accepted, they will attend that school. Early Decision deadlines usually occur between October 1 and November 15, with admission decisions in December. Early Decision applicants are expected to submit only one Early Decision application to one school. They can submit applications to other schools under normal application procedures, but agree that they will withdraw these applications if they are accepted to the Early Decision school. A major drawback to Early Decision is that they leave applicants with no leverage to negotiate for a better financial aid package. We recommend applying Early Decision only if you are positive that you are going to that particular college regardless of the cost.
  • The third type of application is called Early Action. Early Action (EA) programs allow the applicant to apply early, usually before November 15, and receive an early admission decision. However, the student is under no obligation to accept the offer of admission and can wait until May 1 to select which college to attend. Early Action gives students the benefits of early notification, without the obligations of Early Decision. Early admission applicants are free to apply to other schools and compare financial aid offers. Be aware that early application programs may vary in name (Early Read, Early Profile, etc.) and/or conditions so if in doubt, it is always advisable to contact the college's admissions office for clarification.

 

5.80)  Read Chapter 26: STEP 13: Apply Early to 6 to 10 Colleges

 

5.81)  Create and report your final college list

If you are a Magna or Summa Cum Laude Member, next month we will begin mailing out the request for your college list. Our College Picks Form tells us the colleges to which you will be applying, allowing us to determine which financial aid forms are required by each of your schools. Our request for college picks will reoccur by email every two weeks until we have your completed list of colleges.